Research Staff

SANDRA M. RIOS OYOLA, POST-DOC FELLOW, UNIVERSITY OF UTRECHT

Sandra Milena Rios Oyola holds a PhD in Sociology from the University of Aberdeen, UK (2014); her PhD was funded by a competitive scholarship by the Leverhulme Programme “Compromise after Conflict”. Her book ‘Religion, Social Memory and Conflict. The Massacre of Bojayá in Colombia’ will be published by Palgrave Macmillan in June 2015. She has also written on the influence of religion in transitional justice from below and on religious peacebuilding.

She received her MA in Religious Studies from Florida International University (USA) and her BA in Sociology from the Universidad Nacional de Colombia. Sandra has participated in several international conferences and has taught on sociology, conflict and peace studies and qualitative research methods. Her research interests include transitional justice, social memory, social peace processes, democratization and the role of religion in transitional justice and peacebuilding. Her participation in the TJDI project includes a comparative study of the impacts of transitional justice in democratic institution-building in Hungary, Japan, East Germany and South Korea. More information about her publications can be found here.

VALERIE ARNOULD, POST-DOC FELLOW, UNIVERSITY OF EAST LONDON

Valerie Arnould holds a PhD in War Studies from King’s College London, and degrees in international relations and international law from the Universite Libre de Bruxelles. Her dissertation focused on the domestic politics of transitional justice in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. After finishing her PhD she was a visiting lecturer on the human rights programme at the University of the Witwatersrand in South Africa. She previously worked as a research fellow at the Royal Institute for International Relations, where she researched global governance issues. She also worked as a senior analyst for Central Africa and francophone West Africa at a London-based strategic intelligence company. Her interests include armed conflicts in Africa, transitional justice, international criminal law and the politics of the African Great Lakes region.

ELIZABETH RHOADS, RESEARCH FELLOW, UNIVERSITY OF EAST LONDON

Elizabeth Rhoads is a PhD candidate in Law at King’s College London. She holds a Master’s Degree in Human Rights Law from the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London and a bachelor’s degree in Cultural Anthropology with a concentration in Peace and Conflict Studies from Bryn Mawr College in Pennsylvania. Elizabeth is a former Fulbright Research Fellow (Indonesia, 2007-2008) and has been working and researching in Southeast Asia since 2006. She has several years’ experience working at various rights and educational non-profits in the U.S., U.K., Indonesia, and Myanmar. Her interests include armed conflicts in Southeast Asia, land rights, urbanization, state crime, and the role of civil society in democratic transitions.

FILIPA RAIMUNDO, AFFILIATED RESEARCHER

Filipa Raimundo is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Institute of Social Sciences, University of Lisbon. Previously, she was a Postdoctoral Fellow on the TJDI project at the University of Utrecht. Dr. Raimundo holds a PhD in Social and Political Sciences from the European University Institute. Her dissertation focused on transitional justice and the politics of the past in European consolidated democracies. After finishing her PhD she was a research assistant at the Robert Schuman Centre of Advanced Studies (EUI) where she has been collaborating on a project on Small States in EU Decision-Making. She was also a visiting scholar at the University of California at Berkeley and the Juan March Institute in Madrid. Her work has been published by Palgrave Macmillan (forthcoming 2013), Civilização Brasileira (forthcoming 2013), Columbia University Press (2009), and Portuguese Journal of Social Science (2009). Her interests include: democratization, transitional justice, authoritarian legacies, political decision-making, and European studies.

HYE-MIN KIM, RESEARCH ASSISTANT, THE HAGUE INSTITUTE FOR GLOBAL JUSTICE

Hye-Min Kim is a PhD candidate of the Netherlands Institute of Human Rights of the Utrecht University. Her research is about clarifying circumstances under which human rights harm is caused by action or inaction of multiple actors so that the actors are ‘jointly and severally’ responsible for the harm and consequent reparation. She has her LL.M. degree in international human rights law from the University of Essex, United Kingdom, and her master’s degree in international affairs from the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland. She worked for a Korean local NGO, the Beautiful Foundation, as a research coordinator on philanthropy, after volunteering with the humanitarian and emergency relief unit of World Vision Mongolia. She interned at the Office of High Commissioner for Human Rights in Geneva, as well as the Human Rights Law Foundation and the International Organization for Migration (IOM), both in Seoul. Her research interests include: international responsibility of States and non-State actors, human rights remedy and accountability, and extraterritoriality.

JOHANNA HERMAN, RESEARCH FELLOW, UNIVERSITY OF EAST LONDON

Johanna Herman received her MA in International Affairs from Columbia University’s School of International And Public Affairs in 2006, with a concentration in human rights. She holds a BA in Social and Political Sciences from Fitzwilliam College, Cambridge. She has worked in various capacities for UN-HABITAT and the United Nations Development Programme in Japan, Afghanistan and New York and has work experience with a number of international NGOs.Her areas of research interests include transitional justice, peacebuilding and human rights. Her most recent research is on the Khmer Rouge tribunal in Cambodia, focusing on the participation of victims as civil parties and on the outreach efforts of the tribunal. She has also written on peacebuilding in Liberia and DDR and transitional justice. She has co-authored War, Conflict and Human Rights: Theory and Practice with her colleagues at the Centre and co-edited Peacebuilding and Rule of Law in Africa: Just Peace? and Surviving Field Research: Working in Violent and Difficult Situations.

MALINI LAXMINARAYAN, AFFILIATED RESEARCHER, THE HAGUE INSTITUTE FOR GLOBAL JUSTICE

Malini Laxminarayan holds a PhD in Law from the University of Tilburg in the Netherlands. Her dissertation focused on the position of victims in the criminal justice system, examining in which ways a more individualized approach is necessary. She then worked as a research coordinator at the European Forum for Restorative Justice in Leuven, Belgium. Here her research focused on increasing accessibility of restorative justice procedures throughout Europe. Her research interests include victim’s rights, procedural justice, human rights, restorative justice, and rule of law.